International Community Foundation https://icfdn.org Inspiring philanthropy beyond borders in Mexico & Latin America Fri, 15 Sep 2017 23:33:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 4 Ways the Palapa Society is Bettering Todos Santos https://icfdn.org/4-ways-palapa-society-bettering-todos-santos/ https://icfdn.org/4-ways-palapa-society-bettering-todos-santos/#respond Thu, 14 Sep 2017 09:00:41 +0000 https://icfdn.org/?p=3334 For nearly 15 years, the Palapa Society of Todos Santos has administered educational, medical, and environmental programs for local children and their families in the coastal town of Todos Santos, Baja California. Located less than an hour drive from the bustling tourist hubs of Los Cabos, Todos Santos is known as an off-the-beaten-path artists’ colony […]

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For nearly 15 years, the Palapa Society of Todos Santos has administered educational, medical, and environmental programs for local children and their families in the coastal town of Todos Santos, Baja California. Located less than an hour drive from the bustling tourist hubs of Los Cabos, Todos Santos is known as an off-the-beaten-path artists’ colony and surf destination, backed by the Sierra Laguna mountain range.

Recognizing the needs of local children and their families, a group of long-term, dedicated volunteers has worked with other organizations in the community to establish the Palapa Society and provide programs for children to better their lives and the community of Todos Santos. Among the host of programs and initiatives that the Palapa Society offers to the Todos Santos community, here are four that have a big impact and deserve your support.

Opening Doors to Education and Future Opportunity

Education is widely understood to be the key to future opportunities — but unfortunately, the opportunity to get a good education it is not available to everyone. For many students in public schools in Mexico, basic education costs like uniforms and supplies are obstacles to enrolling and staying in school. The Palapa Society’s Scholarship Program helps students to pay for costs like tuition, books, uniforms, and school supplies to attend public school. Scholarships are awarded to students who demonstrate academic merit and are in financial need.

Thanks to this program, last year more than 90 scholarships are awarded to local middle school, high school, and university students in Todos Santos. Since 2003, the Palapa Society has awarded scholarships to more than 550 students who not only devote themselves to their studies, but also give back to their communities through community service.

Thanks to the support they received, many of the Palapa Scholarship students (becarios) have become teachers, architects, engineers, and more. Throughout their professions, they are living out the values that they learned in the program, and continue to improve the lives of those around them long after they’ve graduated.  

Keeping Children Safe through Water Skills  

Todos Santos is a renowned beach and surf destination, perched on the Pacific Ocean. While the ocean is a precious resource and driver of the regional economy, if local children aren’t taught to swim, they can’t take advantage of this amazing natural resource — and the ocean can be dangerous.

For eight years, the Palapa Society has teamed up with Mario Surf School to offer a Water Safety Program. These classes teach children how to swim and other valuable water safety skills — not to mention a love for playing in the ocean, as kids should!

In the Water Safety Program, children literally get their feet wet in a pool, where they first learn to swim and build confidence, before classes move to the beach. In the ocean, they learn about tides, waves, and safety skills. On the final day of classes, students surf for the first time.

After they’ve completed the Water Safety Program, children can enjoy sun, sand, and surf and even seek out water-related job opportunities for years to come.

Cross-Cultural Exchange and English Language Skills

As international tourism in Baja California Sur continues to expand, English language skills become increasingly essential to finding job opportunities for the young people of Todos Santos. The Puente (Bridge) to English Program offers a fun and creative atmosphere for students to learn English from native English-speaking volunteers. Every child who wants to learn English is welcomed; no child is turned away.

With many of the English teachers coming from other countries, students not only learn English, but also learn about other cultures and how to relate to those of other cultures. This cross-cultural exchange enriches the students’ learning experience and also helps to set them up for success in the local job market.  

The Palapa Learning Center: A Higher Quality Education

As part of its commitment to ensuring children and youth in Todos Santos receive a robust education, after years of fundraising, curriculum and construction design, and permitting from the Mexican Ministry of Education, the Palapa Society was thrilled to open the doors of the new Palapa Learning Center for their inaugural school year on Aug. 16, 2017.

This new school will offer middle and high school students a high-quality, rigorous curriculum and an environment where they are encouraged to learn through methodologies that will prepare them for the 21st century job-market. The three-building site houses all of the Palapa Society’s current programs, including the Community Library, the Puente (Bridge to English),  Adult English community courses, and Children’s Arts & Crafts. Currently, students are participating in the selection and design of new programs, such as sports teams and advanced math, that they wish to receive at their new high school.

The cumulative effect of these programs is that the Palapa Center is more than just a school — it is a center for learning and exchange for the entire community.

It is exciting to see the construction completed, and students in class, but continued support is needed to keep the new Palapa Learning Center running. Make a donation today to support the future for the youth of Todos Santos.

 

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6 Opportunities for You to Advocate for Water https://icfdn.org/6-opportunities-advocate-water/ https://icfdn.org/6-opportunities-advocate-water/#respond Thu, 31 Aug 2017 09:00:51 +0000 https://icfdn.org/?p=3294 Scientists recently discovered proof of water in the moon, but that doesn’t mean it’s time to give up on improving the quality of our water here on Earth. Now more than ever, it’s critical to protect our oceans, lakes, and rivers, which sustain our ecosystems and make life possible. If you’re looking for opportunities to […]

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Scientists recently discovered proof of water in the moon, but that doesn’t mean it’s time to give up on improving the quality of our water here on Earth. Now more than ever, it’s critical to protect our oceans, lakes, and rivers, which sustain our ecosystems and make life possible.

If you’re looking for opportunities to support great organizations safeguarding our most precious resource, look no further. Here are six projects in Northwest Mexico that deserve your support.

Amigos para la Conservación de Cabo Pulmo, A.C. (ACCP)

Region: East Cape, Baja California Sur, Mexico

Why it’s worth your support:

Cabo Pulmo National Park is a place of stunning beauty, which makes it a target of major tourism developers who pose a threat to its ecosystem. ACCP is fiercely protecting the park’s coral reefs, fisheries, and marine life. With volunteers and neighbors, they have created a recycling program, an interpretative trail, a community pride program, and a water quality monitoring program to maintain the park’s natural beauty for years to come.  

Support ACCP today.

Baja California Waterkeeper Fund

Region: Baja California Peninsula

Why it’s worth your support:

The Baja California Waterkeeper Fund fights for clean water and healthy communities. Through the efforts of their regional collaborative of ten individual Waterkeepers, the Baja California Waterkeeper Fund monitors water quality of more than 75 sites along the coastline and makes the results available to the public. They also organize community education workshops, beach cleanups, and efforts to restore and protect watershed ecosystems.

Support the Baja California Waterkeeper Fund now.

Eco-Alianza de Loreto

Region: Loreto, Baja California Sur, Mexico

Why it’s worth your support:

Eco-Alianza de Loreto protects the Loreto Bay National Park, a gorgeous marine park and a UN World Heritage Site of nearly 800 square miles in the Gulf of California. They work with local fishermen, conduct education and outreach, and test local water quality to address threats to the marine protected area. Eco-Alianza recently launched the Community Center for the Environment, a local and regional hub for conservation, community, and educational cooperation, and is celebrating its 10th anniversary in 2017.

Make a difference in Loreto Bay National Park today.

Fundación Cántaro Azul

Region: La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico

Why it’s worth your support:

Fundación Cántaro Azul improves the health and wellbeing of people living in marginalized communities through the design, implementation, and evaluation of water and environmental solutions. Cántaro Azul collaborates with individuals and communities, as well as academic centers, government institutions, international organizations, the private sector, and civil society. By working with others to improve water quality, Cántaro Azul is changing the water landscape in Mexico.

Give to Fundación Cántaro Azul now.

Restauremos El Colorado

Region: Colorado River Delta, Baja California, Mexico

Why it’s worth your support:

Did you know the Colorado River, which created the Grand Canyon, is mostly a dry riverbed in its delta in Mexico?

Restauremos El Colorado is the first binational water trust created to bring a river back to life and restore endangered wetland areas in the Colorado River delta. By securing water rights, Restauremos El Colorado is delivering flows to the delta and managing wetland restoration projects. This allows local communities to become stewards of the river and will help transform the dry riverbed into a flowing river with restored native cottonwood and willow forests.

Support Restauremos El Colorado’s restoration efforts today.

Vigilantes de Bahia Magdalena

Region: Magdalena Bay, Baja California Sur, Mexico

Why it’s worth your support:

Magdalena Bay has a thriving ecosystem of sea turtles, shellfish, and fish, which drives an economy of commercial fishing. By testing water quality, monitoring mangroves, and educating local decision makers, students, and fishermen, Vigilantes is protecting the bay’s ecological balance and ensuring that fishing will be a viable activity for years to come.

Make a difference in Magdalena Bay now.

The International Community Foundation is committed to aiding water improvements efforts throughout Mexico. Learn more about what we do here. To support these and many other incredible organizations trying to protect our planet, visit ICF’s donation page.

 

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How Mangrove Forests Are Sustaining Our Climate https://icfdn.org/mangrove-forests-sustaining-climate/ https://icfdn.org/mangrove-forests-sustaining-climate/#respond Thu, 24 Aug 2017 09:00:51 +0000 https://icfdn.org/?p=3288 The post How Mangrove Forests Are Sustaining Our Climate appeared first on International Community Foundation.

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Mangroves forests have evolved to thrive in flooded coastal areas; several species have adapted to freshwater to brackish to saline water conditions over hundreds of years. Though these conditions would make life impossible for many other plants in Baja’s coastal waters, mangroves have discovered how to prosper and create incredible ecosystems.

The Baja California peninsula is home to 700,000 hectares (over 1.7 million acres) of mangroves, which is 5% of the world’s total mangrove population. What’s more, researchers have found that these coastal trees are more efficient than their tropical counterparts, storing 5 times more carbon below ground. As a unique natural resource, mangroves offer coastal protection against unpredictable weather, food and shelter for various animal species, and carbon sequestration.

The value of Baja’s mangroves is so great that estimates suggest they contribute $70 billion to the Mexican economy each year. Yet, despite all this, the country’s mangrove forests are shrinking.

The Benefits of Mangrove Forests

The advantages of mangrove forests have been thoroughly researched by environmental scientists, who discovered that keeping more mangroves intact allowed them to avoid the release of around 13 million metric tons of CO2 into the atmosphere. That’s equivalent to removing 344,000 cars from the road each year.

The primary benefit of mangrove forests is their ability to act as effective carbon stores. Mangrove soils are rich in carbon, which the tree itself absorbs, reducing the planet’s exposure to dangerous gasses. Additionally, many fisheries rely on mangroves as breeding grounds.

In some circumstances, a mangrove forest can even act as a natural source of defense for the local coastline, reducing erosion, limiting the impact of storm surges, and attenuating waves. In the long-term, scientists believe that mangroves could help to maintain elevation for land masses in the face of rising sea levels.

The Threats Facing Mangrove Forests

Despite the value of Baja’s mangroves, Mexico continues to have one of the highest rates of mangrove deforestation in the world. Studies suggest that a quarter of a century from now, half of all Mexico’s mangroves will be gone.

More than 35% of the world’s mangroves has already disappeared due to a range of threats that include, but aren’t limited to:

  • Agricultural clearing practices: People who don’t understand the value of mangrove forests have contributed to their clearing in exchange for new agricultural land, shrimp farms, and salt farms.
  • Overharvesting: The strong and durable nature of mangrove wood makes it an appealing material. The rate of harvesting today is becoming unsustainable, with mangroves in some areas facing extinction.
  • Environmental changes: Building irrigation solutions and dams has led to changes in the amount of salt water reaching mangrove forests. Like most plants, mangroves require a specific habitat to thrive.
  • Pollution: The ongoing threat of pollution from fertilizers, pesticides, and other toxic chemicals carried by river systems can smother mangrove roots and kill the animals living within their delicate ecosystems.
  • Climate change: For sustainable survival, mangrove forests require stable sea levels. They are very sensitive to the impact of climate change and global warming, which are causing higher water levels.

The Dangers of Mangrove Deforestation

The destruction of mangrove forests doesn’t just present a danger to the creatures that thrive within their ecosystems. Since mangroves store thousands of years of carbon dioxide beneath the soil, the destruction of these forests can release huge amounts of greenhouse gasses into the atmosphere. According to recent findings, while mangroves only make up 0.6% of global tropical forests, their deforestation is responsible for as much as 12% of greenhouse gas emissions.

One study found that mangroves in Baja have continued to grow over undecomposed root structures to adapt to rising sea levels. This process of survival has contributed to layers of peat that are more than 2,000 years old and filled with carbon deposits. As a result, the mangroves that account for around 1% of the arid northwest in Mexico store about 28% of the nation’s carbon.

At ICF, we’re fighting back against the deforestation of mangroves and contributing to the maintenance of an ecosystem that protects various forms of life. ICF has been funding research projects in the Galapagos Islands and in the Gulf of California, Mexico to learn more about local mangrove stands.  

Contact ICF today and speak to our team about how you can help us save the mangrove forests and protect this precious ecosystem.

 

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Cozy Up to the Whales in San Ignacio Lagoon https://icfdn.org/cozy-whales-san-ignacio-lagoon/ Thu, 27 Jul 2017 09:00:48 +0000 https://icfdn.org/?p=3250 The post Cozy Up to the Whales in San Ignacio Lagoon appeared first on International Community Foundation.

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Classified as a baleen whale, this majestic marine mammal migrates between feeding and breeding grounds, such as San Ignacio Lagoon in Baja California, Mexico, during its 55 to 70 years of existence. As the sole living species in the genus Eschrichtius, the gray whale has a family line that dates back over 30 million years.

But that family line could cease to exist if we don’t take action to protect these creatures and their precious habitats. Read on to learn more about the why gray whales congregate in San Ignacio Lagoon, the ways in which organizations are trying to protect them, and how you can help — or even experience them yourself, in Laguna San Ignacio!

San Ignacio Lagoon: A Popular Destination

Tucked into the middle of the Baja California peninsula, which separates the Pacific Ocean from the Gulf of California, San Ignacio Lagoon stretches 16 miles from the coast into the desert. As one of the primary destinations of gray whale migration, these mammals travel here in order to mate, birth their young, and prepare them for the journey to their summer feeding grounds in the Arctic.

The lagoon is divided into three sections, making it the ideal setup for whale breeding. The upper lagoon is the shallowest area where pregnant gray whales birth their young. The middle lagoon is the corridor along which mothers travel with their newborn calves to the lower lagoon, where most of the social behavior occurs.

It is this unique social behavior, that makes San Ignacio Lagoon such a magical experience.

In the late nineteenth century, whaling captain Jared Poole found San Ignacio Lagoon to be a whale breeding ground. This discovery almost led to the extinction of the Pacific gray whale, as increasing numbers of whaling ships came to take advantage of the mammal’s migration patterns. Fortunately, a collaboration between local and international players led to incredible protections for these great creatures.

Growing Support for Gray Whales

The first big push for conservation came in 1949, when Mexico began its adherence to the International Whaling Commission, protecting gray whales from commercial whaling. In 1979, San Ignacio Lagoon was decreed a refuge for cetaceans, and in 1988, Mexico established El Vizcaino Biosphere Reserve to include the lagoon. Now a UNESCO World Heritage Site and Latin America’s largest wildlife sanctuary, this protected area has allowed the whales to significantly repopulate.

But a potential threat to the breeding ground appeared in 1994. Barely a month after the gray whale had been removed from the endangered species list, Mitsubishi made a proposal to set up one of the world’s largest salt works on the banks of San Ignacio Lagoon. Fortunately, after 1 million petitions and years of activism from a coalition of fishermen, environmentalists, and scientists, the plans for the polluting 116-square-mile plant were abandoned in 2000.

An Alliance is Formed

This close call reminded the conservation community that San Ignacio Lagoon deserved special attention and protection.  In 2005, ICF joined forces with the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), Pronatura Noroeste A.C., Ejido Luis Echeverria Alvarez, and Wildcoast/Costasalvaje to form the Laguna San Ignacio Conservation Alliance. Working together with local communities to provide permanent protection to the lagoon, the Alliance has continued to prioritize both conservation and community development projects to protect gray whale habitat, local livelihoods, and a sense of place for local residents.  

So far, we have secured 140,000 acres of key land, zoned an additional 193,000 acres of land to conservation, and protected 150 miles of coastline for public access and conservation.  The collaboration among the Alliance partners has demonstrated that conservation and local economies can work together to protect habitat and create sustainable livelihoods.  

How You Can Help

Despite these great achievements, there is always more that needs to be done. In order to continue protecting San Ignacio Lagoon, we need your help.

Our goal is to raise $200,000, which will fund the monitoring and protection of the lagoon for two years. You can help brighten the future of the gray whale by making a donation today.

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The Palapa Society of Todos Santos: “Baja Under the Stars” https://icfdn.org/palapa-society-todos-santos-baja-stars/ Fri, 21 Jul 2017 00:03:46 +0000 https://icfdn.org/?p=3268 September 15, 2017

Buy your tickets now! Don't miss out on the Palapa Society's first stateside event on September 15th at the Denver Botanic Gardens, featuring Grammy award-winning La Santa Cecilia. All funds raised will support the Palapa Society's education programs in Todos Santos.

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UPCOMING EVENTS

Denver, Colorado USA | September 15, 2017

The Palapa Society of Todos Santos, Mexico, invites you to attend their first state-side event, “Baja Under the Stars”. ICF is excited to sponsor this memorable evening with Grammy Award-winning band La Santa Cecilia at the beautiful Denver Botanic Gardens.

The Palapa Society’s mission is to improve the quality of life and offer a brighter future for local children and their families through scholarships and educational programs. This event will celebrate the opening of the new Palapa Learning Center, a 4-building campus which will open in the fall. Proceeds from the event will fund new technology, scholarships, supplies, and equipment for over 120 students seeking a university-track education in Todos Santos, Mexico.

Buy Tickets Here! 

Friday September 15, 2017
Denver Botanic Gardens

5:30 p.m.
VIP Champagne Meet and Greet
6:00 p.m.
Dinner and Entertainment by
Grammy Award-Winning band La Santa Cecilia

Tickets

$225.00 USD per person – Dinner and entertainment
$275.00 USD per person – VIP Champagne Meet and Greet
(limited space), dinner and entertainment (reserved seating) 

Sponsorships

$2,500.00 USD Silver Level
$5,000.00 USD Gold Level
$10,000.00 USD Platinum Level
Please email tickets@palapasociety.org for more information about sponsorships.

Tickets, sponsorships and donations are eligible for a U.S. tax deduction through The Palapa Society of Todos Santos, A.C. fund at the International Community Foundation.

 

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Contributing to Better Water Quality in Baja https://icfdn.org/contributing-better-water-quality-baja/ Thu, 20 Jul 2017 09:00:26 +0000 https://icfdn.org/?p=3245 The post Contributing to Better Water Quality in Baja appeared first on International Community Foundation.

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Water is life. We cannot live without it, and yet many communities depend on water sources that are unsafe for drinking, bathing, fishing or recreation — causing illness and significantly lowering the quality of life for residents and tourists alike.

For over 27 years, the International Community Foundation and our loyal donors have supported the people of Baja California Mexico, through efforts to increase access to and quality of clean water, particularly in coastal communities.

One result of this collaborative work is the Baja Waterkeepers Fund, through which ICF financially and programmatically supports the ten Baja Waterkeepers located throughout the Baja Peninsula. These ten waterkeepers and their host organizations are members of The Waterkeeper Alliance, a U.S. non-profit focused solely on advocating for and protecting clean water in communities around the world. Read on to learn more about what this invaluable group does and how you can help support them, too.

Understanding the Environment

The Baja Waterkeepers are 10 individuals who monitor over 75 sites along the Baja coastline for bacteria, agrochemical, and other pollutants that pose public health risks.

Driven by passion and knowledge, the group stays in close communication with the communities they serve, addressing concerns about the safe use of water when it comes to bathing, fishing, and drinking. This is especially important in communities in or near former mining sites which often have heavy metal contaminants in their water sources.

The Waterkeepers also monitor marine protected areas and national parks to ensure that Mexico’s fishing laws are being enforced.  Finally, by conducting educational and business development workshops, they engage the local community in order to ensure a more sustainable, healthy future for the human, and animal, residents of the region.

Keeping the Community Safe

The results of the Waterkeepers’ regular water-quality monitoring tests are regularly uploaded to a free online swim guide. This guide not only ensures that communities know of safe places for their families to swim, but it also helps the local economy. Fishermen and tour operators can make smarter decisions regarding their activities when they know the level of cleanliness of the water — and understanding the impacts that their actions are having on the local resources they depend on, can help to change behaviors for the better! The usefulness of the Swim Guide is proven by the significant boost in public demand for it; between 2015 and 2016 alone, the number of users of the Mexican version increased by over 500%.

The Baja Waterkeepers also build local awareness by conducting beach cleanups and youth leadership programs to protect the 75 watershed ecosystems. These initiatives engage communities in their own self-preservation and teach younger generations that the power and responsibility to create change is in their hands.

Baja Waterkeepers in the Spotlight

To learn more about the Waterkeepers and what motivates them to protect this region, let’s meet two of the members.

Margarita Diaz

Margarita Diaz is particularly passionate about the relationship between the people of Tijuana and the coastal waters that border their homes. As the Executive Director of Proyecto Fronterizo de Educacion Ambiental, she believes keeping locals informed is most important for restoring the water back to its full health so that everyone can enjoy it.

Hector Trinidad

Hector Trinidad is the Program Coordinator of Eco Alianza in Loreto, BCS. He shares his vision with many of his neighbors – sport and commercial fishermen, conservationists, and community members. The vision is “to continue to use their natural resources in a way that is more responsible, better informed, with better practices each time.”

How You Can Help

In February 2017, ICF and other partners of the Baja Waterkeepers kicked off a fundraising campaign to secure $500,000 to sustain the operations, programs, and advocacy efforts of our 10 Baja Waterkeepers for the next 3 years.

By making a donation, you will be supporting this work and changing the lives of people who can’t take clean water for granted. Make a donation today and make a difference for the future.

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NEWS: ICF Funds Restoration of Iconic Monument in Baja California Sur https://icfdn.org/news-icf-funds-restoration-iconic-monument-baja-california-sur/ Tue, 06 Jun 2017 00:12:57 +0000 https://icfdn.org/?p=3213 ICF Funds Restoration of Iconic Monument in Baja California Sur. Voice of San Diego, by Sarah Beauchemin.
The Southern California – Baja California mega-region has a long, shared history. But one aspect of our region’s communal past in particular served as a major link between Southern California and Baja for decades: Mining. (...) In order to assist with conservation, ICF has partnered with the Mexican nonprofit Corredor Histórico CAREM, A.C. (CAREM) to restore a true relic of Baja’s mining era: the “La Ramona” smokestack.

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ICF in the News

ICF Funds Restoration of Iconic Monument in Baja California Sur. Voice of San Diego Partner Voices by Sarah Beauchemin. The Southern California – Baja California mega-region has a long, shared history. But one aspect of our region’s communal past in particular served as a major link between Southern California and Baja for decades: Mining. Throughout the 19th century, precious metals mining in Baja produced a robust economy not only for its own citizens, but also for Americans. American companies, many based in California, invested in Baja mining operations. As such, mining connected communities across the border – both culturally and economically – helping to lay the groundwork for the shared mega-region we enjoy today (…). In order to assist with conservation, ICF has partnered with the Mexican nonprofit Corredor Histórico CAREM, A.C. (CAREM) to restore a true relic of Baja’s mining era: the “La Ramona” smokestack.  Read the full article

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NEWS: ICF’s Marisa Quiroz Awarded “2017 HIP Giver” by Hispanics in Philanthropy (HIP) https://icfdn.org/news-icfs-marisa-quiroz-awarded-2017-hip-giver-hispanics-philanthropy-hip/ Fri, 26 May 2017 00:04:23 +0000 https://icfdn.org/?p=3206 ICF Senior Officer for Environment, Marisa Quiroz, was one of 33 Hispanic leaders in philanthropy awarded the 2017 HIP Giver award by national organization Hispanics In Philanthropy (HIP). We are proud to have her on our Team!

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Together We Can Make a Difference. STAY INFORMED

NEWS + RESOURCES
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ICF in the News

ICF’s Senior Program Officer for Environment, Marisa Quiroz named a “2017 HIPGiver” by Hispanics in Philanthropy (HIP). In March 2017, Hispanics in Philanthropy honored 33 HIPGivers (corresponding to HIP’s 33rd year of philanthropy) for their incredible generosity, and ICF’s Marisa Quiroz was selected for her contributions to the philanthopy. According to HIP President, Diana Campoamor, “these stories represent Latino givers of all types – organizers, actors, executives, teachers, artists, and nurturers; the common thread is a deep care for their communities and a conviction that even small acts of giving can create enormous change. I hope you enjoy their stories, and that their light will inspire you to burn yours even more brightly”.

Hispanics in Philanthropy (HIP) is committed to strengthening Latino communities by increasing resources for the Latino and Latin American civil sector and by increasing Latino participation and leadership throughout the field of philanthropy. Read Marisa’s Profile in HIPGivers. Congratulations Marisa!

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NEWS: ICF Grantee Octavio Aburto receives The Explorer’s Club Award https://icfdn.org/news-icf-grantee-octavio-aburto-receives-explorers-club-award/ Wed, 12 Apr 2017 18:59:45 +0000 https://icfdn.org/?p=3187 ICF Grantee Octavio Aburto receives The Explorer's Club Award. For his 2017 Artist-in-Exploration award, “MANGROVES: THE SKIN OF OUR COASTS,” Octavio will conduct four expeditions to four different mangrove forests located in the Tropical Eastern Pacific Ocean.

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Together We Can Make a Difference. STAY INFORMED

NEWS + RESOURCES

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ICF in the News

The Explorer’s Club, April 2017. Octavio Aburto awarded Rolex 2017 Artist-in-Exploration for Mangrove research. Octavio Aburto is a professional photographer and assistant professor at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, CA. His research and photography have focused on marine reserves and commercially exploited marine species in Mexico, Belize, Costa Rica, Ecuador and the United States.

For his 2017 Artist-in-Exploration award, “MANGROVES: THE SKIN OF OUR COASTS,” Octavio will conduct four expeditions to four different mangrove forests located in the Tropical Eastern Pacific Ocean. Mangrove forests are quickly disappearing. We have lost nearly 50% in the last half-century.  Yet they are economically vital to local populations and in the fight for climate balance, mangrove forests store more carbon per acre than any other tropical forests. Read Full Article and contact Marisa@icfdn.org to learn more about how to support Octavio’s important mangrove research and work through ICF.

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NEWS: Want to Do Business in Baja? Here’s 5 People You Need to Know https://icfdn.org/news-want-business-baja-heres-5-people-need-know/ Thu, 06 Apr 2017 22:30:06 +0000 https://icfdn.org/?p=3184 Want to Do Business in Baja? Here’s 5 People You Need to Know. ICF's President/CEO, Anne McEnany, is named one of 5 local experts who can help you navigate the landscape of cross-border business.

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HATCH – produced by San Diego Magazine, April 6, 2017. Want to Do Business in Baja? Here’s 5 People You Need to Know. ICF’s President/CEO, Anne McEnany, is named one of 5 local experts who can help you navigate the landscape of cross-border business. Read Full Article.

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